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3 STEPS TO TAKE TO PROECT YOUR RIGHT TO WORKERS COMPENSATION BENEFITS

In Idaho, an employee who has been injured on the job or incurred an occupational disease is entitled to workers compensation benefits. The benefits may include:

1) Medical treatment and therapy arising from an industrial accident or occupational illness at no cost to the employee;

2) Temporary Total Disability Benefits;

3) Temporary Partial Disability Benefits;

4) Impairment Benefits;

5) Retraining Benefits; and

6) Permanent Disability Benefits.

AN EMPLOYEE HAS A LIMITED TIME TO NOTIFY AN EMPLOYER OF AN INJURY ARISING FROM AN INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT OR ONSET OF AN OCCUPATIONAL DISEASE TO PRESERVE THE EMPLOYEE’S RIGHT TO WORKERS COMPENSATION

In order to preserve an employee’s claim to any of the workers compensation benefits noted above, an employee has up to 60 days in which to notify the employer from the date of injury or occupational disease. Failure to notify the employer within the aforesaid 60 days of injury or illness could act as a complete bar to the injured worker obtaining any recovery for workers compensation benefits.

FOLLOWING AN INJURY OR ONSET OF AN OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS, AN EMPLOYEE SHOULD CONTACT THE IDAHO INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION TO INSURE THAT THE EMPLOYER AS SUBMITTED ON THE EMPLOYEE’S BEHALF A FIRST REPORT OF INJURY OR ILLNESS.

Employers are supposed to notify the Idaho Industrial Commission of any injuries or occupational illnesses their employees report. However, there are noted a number of cases where employers have failed to do so, and a controversy follows as to whether the employee notified the employer of the injury or illness in a timely manner.

WHAT CAN AN INJURED EMPLOYEE DO TO INSURE THE EMPLOYEE’S LEGAL RIGHTS AND REMEDIES TO WORKERS COMPENSATION BENEFITS?

In order to preserve the employee’s legal rights and remedies to workers compensation benefits, the employee should take the initiative and take three (3) essential steps to avoid any controversy as to whether the employee is entitled to workers compensation, namely:

1) Immediately notify the employer of the injury arising from an industrial accident or onset of an occupation illness;

2) Contact the Idaho Industrial Commission at 208.334.6000 to determine whether the employer has submitted a First Report of Injury or Illness to the Commission; and,

3) Talk with an experienced workers compensation attorney to ascertain your legal rights and entitlement to workers compensation benefits.

BOISE WORKERS COMPENSATION ATTORNEY ALAN MORTON HAS OVER 32 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE HELPING INJURED EMPLOYEES SEEK AND OBTAIN WORKERS COMPENSATION BENEFITS ARISING FROM AN INDUSTRIAL ACCIDENT OR OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS.

If you or a loved one have been injured as a result of an industrial accident or occupational illness, you should contact an experienced workers compensation attorney to schedule a free initial consultation to ascertain your legal rights and remedies to workers compensation. Failure to do so could prejudice your legal rights and remedies.

Boise Workers Compensation Attorney Alan Morton has over 32 years of experience in helping victims of industrial accidents and occupational illnesses seek and obtain workers compensation in Idaho. Mr. Morton is available to meet with you in an initial free consultation at his office or your home, workplace, hospital or any other convenient location to help you better understand your legal rights and remedies and to assist you obtain the benefits you are entitled to receive.

You may contact Mr. Morton at 208.344.5555 or toll free at 800.716.8021 or by completing an online contact form. Mr. Morton has assisted hundreds of workers injured in the workplace. You may wish to read the testimonials from Mr. Morton’s former clients. Mr. Morton has received AVVO’s highest rating of 10.0 (Superb) for Workers Compensation due to his experience, reputation and peer reviews. He is always willing to lend a helping hand to victims of personal injury, wrongful death and workers compensation.


Alan Morton
Advocate for Justice/Trial Lawyer